Yamato and Musashi Internet Photo Archive
Yamato and Musashi Internet Photo Archive
Yamato2

WELCOME TO THE INTERNET'S YAMATO & MUSASHI BATTLESHIP PHOTO ARCHIVE! (EST. 08/2008)

PLEASE READ THE FOLLOWING NAVIGATION INSTRUCTIONS FIRST:

INDEX PAGE LINKS ARE LOCATED ABOVE THE INDEX PHOTOS ON LEFT. TO SEE INDIVIDUAL PHOTOS, CLICK ON EACH THUMBNAIL, THEN CLICK AGAIN ON THE ENLARGED PHOTO IN THE LOWER RIGHT-HAND CORNER OF THIS PAGE AND FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS.

NOTE: TO LEARN ABOUT YAMATO'S EFFECTIVENESS IN BATTLE, READ ROBERT LUNDGREN'S SEMINAL WORK ON THE BATTLE OF LEYTE GULF: AMAZON PAGE:

'THE WORLD WONDER'D' - BATTLE OF LEYTE GULF by Robert Lundgren

YAMATO SHIRTS, POSTERS, MUGS, CAPS NOW AVAILABLE AT THE YAMATO ZAZZLE STORE:

BATTLESHIP YAMATO ZAZZLE STORE

All of the archive photos in this gallery were obtained by various researchers from the National Archives of the United States, and the US Navy Archives, and are in the Public Domain.

LINKS:

These will be of interest to all Yamato, Musashi, IJN, & warship fans:

IJN IN COLOR WEBSITE BY IROOTOKO_JR

MUSASHI EXPEDITION

CLASSICWARSHIPS.COM

IJN YAMATO - TABULAR RECORD OF MOVEMENT

THE ROBERT LUNDGREN HISTORICAL RESOURCE

MODEL WARSHIPS.COM

IMPERIAL JAPANESE NAVY PAGE (COMBINED FLEET)

MILITARY PHOTOS.NET

STEELNAVY.COM

IJN SHIP DOWNLOADABLE 'PERSONAS' FOR FIREFOX BROWSER

YAMATO'S FINAL BATTLE CGI FILM

YAMATO AT THE BATTLE OF LEYTE GULF CGI FILM

For a serious historical Pacific War discussion site, run by renowned historian Anthony Tully, co-author of "Shattered Sword - The Untold Story of The Battle of Midway", go here:

TULLY'S PORT

Finally, there are 3 indispensable books for any Yamato enthusiast:

Janusz Skulski-The Battleship Yamato-Anatomy of a Ship

Russell Spurr-A Glorious Way to Die - The Kamikaze Mission of the Battleship Yamato

Yoshida Mitsuru-Requiem for Battleship Yamato (An incredible survivor's account of the battle.)

A good reconstruction of Yamato as she appeared during her Final Sortie in April 1945 can be found at:

1:200 YAMATO MODEL

This site is a member of WebRing.
To browse visit Here.

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Operation Ten-ichi-go, April 6-7, 1945 
 
The Yamato Task Force is sighted by US Navy scout flying boats on the morning of April 7, 1945. Yamato fires a salvo of 18.1" "San-shikidan" AA shells at the flying boats, but misses. Admiral Ito then directs that the ship change its zig-zag course and steam straight for Okinawa at full speed, as any element of surprise had just been lost.

The discussion about the upcoming mission among the younger officers on Yamato in the week prior to Operation Ten'ichigo had been heated, as Yoshida relates:

"The young captain of one of the destroyers grilled Admiral Kusaka's entourage: if, as the parting words of the chief of staff of the Combined Fleet indicate, the power of the Imperial Navy is really to be marshaled for this one battle, 'then why doesn't Admiral Toyoda himself venture out from his bunker at Hiyoshi and assume direct command?' He was voicing the innermost thoughts of the entire crew of this special attack force.

What are the prospects for Operation Ten'ichigo? The vehement debate among the officers continues. Those arguing that it can only fail are in the overwhelming majority.... In addition: doubts...that we will be as vulnerable as a man walking alone on a dark night carrying only a lantern;.. ..that midway we will fall victim to airborne torpedoes. (This prediction, subscribed to by a large number of the young officers, will prove to be precisely on the mark.)

Against this sharp contention that the mission is doomed to fail, chief officer of the watch Lieutenant Usubuchi..binoculars fixed on the sea at dusk, speaks in a low voice, almost a whisper: 'The side which makes no progress never wins. To lose and be brought to one's senses: that is the supreme path. 'Japan has paid too little attention to progress. We have been too finicky, too wedded to selfish ethics; we have forgotten true progress. How else can Japan be saved except by losing and coming to its senses? If Japan does not come to its senses now, when will it be saved? 'We will lead the way. We will die as harbingers of Japan's new life. That's where our real satisfaction lies, isn't it?'

Lieutenant Usubuchi's firmly held opinion becomes the general conclusion of the serious discussion continuing day after day in the wardroom. No one is able to refute it."

Yoshida Mitsuru, "Requiem for Battleship Yamato"