Yamato and Musashi Internet Photo Archive
Yamato and Musashi Internet Photo Archive
Yamato2

WELCOME TO THE INTERNET'S YAMATO & MUSASHI BATTLESHIP PHOTO ARCHIVE! (EST. 08/2008)

PLEASE READ THE FOLLOWING NAVIGATION INSTRUCTIONS FIRST:

INDEX PAGE LINKS ARE LOCATED ABOVE THE INDEX PHOTOS ON LEFT. TO SEE INDIVIDUAL PHOTOS, CLICK ON EACH THUMBNAIL, THEN CLICK AGAIN ON THE ENLARGED PHOTO IN THE LOWER RIGHT-HAND CORNER OF THIS PAGE AND FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS.

NOTE: TO LEARN ABOUT YAMATO'S EFFECTIVENESS IN BATTLE, READ ROBERT LUNDGREN'S SEMINAL WORK ON THE BATTLE OF LEYTE GULF: AMAZON PAGE:

'THE WORLD WONDER'D' - BATTLE OF LEYTE GULF by Robert Lundgren

YAMATO SHIRTS, POSTERS, MUGS, CAPS NOW AVAILABLE AT THE YAMATO ZAZZLE STORE:

BATTLESHIP YAMATO ZAZZLE STORE

All of the archive photos in this gallery were obtained by various researchers from the National Archives of the United States, and the US Navy Archives, and are in the Public Domain.

LINKS:

These will be of interest to all Yamato, Musashi, IJN, & warship fans:

IJN IN COLOR WEBSITE BY IROOTOKO_JR

MUSASHI EXPEDITION

CLASSICWARSHIPS.COM

IJN YAMATO - TABULAR RECORD OF MOVEMENT

THE ROBERT LUNDGREN HISTORICAL RESOURCE

MODEL WARSHIPS.COM

IMPERIAL JAPANESE NAVY PAGE (COMBINED FLEET)

MILITARY PHOTOS.NET

STEELNAVY.COM

IJN SHIP DOWNLOADABLE 'PERSONAS' FOR FIREFOX BROWSER

YAMATO'S FINAL BATTLE CGI FILM

YAMATO AT THE BATTLE OF LEYTE GULF CGI FILM

For a serious historical Pacific War discussion site, run by renowned historian Anthony Tully, co-author of "Shattered Sword - The Untold Story of The Battle of Midway", go here:

TULLY'S PORT

Finally, there are 3 indispensable books for any Yamato enthusiast:

Janusz Skulski-The Battleship Yamato-Anatomy of a Ship

Russell Spurr-A Glorious Way to Die - The Kamikaze Mission of the Battleship Yamato

Yoshida Mitsuru-Requiem for Battleship Yamato (An incredible survivor's account of the battle.)

A good reconstruction of Yamato as she appeared during her Final Sortie in April 1945 can be found at:

1:200 YAMATO MODEL

This site is a member of WebRing.
To browse visit Here.

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Operation Ten-ichi-go, April 6-7, 1945 
 
This remarkable photo, taken a fraction of a second after the last one, appears to show the exact moment when the third and/or fourth bombs strike aft of the funnel and main mast. These would prove the deadliest of many bomb hits to come. The bombs slice in at an angle in the narrow opening between the rear fire control director and the rear 6" secondary turret, wiping out two machine gun mounts and their crews on their way down, slicing into the radar control room and exploding there.

The radar room and all inside it are wiped out; the force of the blast also knocks out the rear fire control director and sets off a secondary explosion in the aft 6" secondary turret, which destroys it and starts a fire that is never extinguished.

Seconds after this photo is taken, Yoshida arrives at the radar room:

"It is as if someone had taken an ax and split a bamboo tube. The bomb, a direct hit, must have sliced its way in at an angle and then exploded.

Tuned and retuned in preparation for today's defensive battle, the instruments have been scattered in all directions...I notice a chunk of flesh smashed into a panel of the broken bulkhead, a red barrel of flesh about as big around as two arms can reach.

It must be a torso from which all extremities - arms, legs, head - have been ripped off.

Noticing four hunks nearby, I pick them up and set them in front of me.

To the charred flesh are stuck here and there pieces of khaki-colored material, apparently scraps of military uniform. The smell of fat is heavy in the air.

It goes without saying that I cannot tell where head and arms and legs might have been attached.

That it should be impossible to tell one corpse from another!

As I lift them, they are still hot from burning; when I run my hand over them, they feel like the bark of a rough tree.

My fellow officers and men who were alive and at work here until a few minutes ago, and these hunks of flesh: one and the same, separated only by time!

How can I believe that?

The lives lodged in these four bodies - where have they gone?

The other eight men have been completely blown away; not even the stench of their deaths is left to float in the air.

What emptiness!

How did they die, those beings who only a moment ago were so real?

I cannot stop doubting, stop marveling.

It is not grief and resentment. It is not fear. It is total disbelief. As I touch these hunks of flesh, for a moment I am completely lost in thought."

Yoshida Mitsuru, "Requiem for Battleship Yamato"