Yamato and Musashi Internet Photo Archive
Yamato and Musashi Internet Photo Archive
Yamato2

WELCOME TO THE INTERNET'S YAMATO & MUSASHI BATTLESHIP PHOTO ARCHIVE! (EST. 08/2008)

PLEASE READ THE FOLLOWING NAVIGATION INSTRUCTIONS FIRST:

INDEX PAGE LINKS ARE LOCATED ABOVE THE INDEX PHOTOS ON LEFT. TO SEE INDIVIDUAL PHOTOS, CLICK ON EACH THUMBNAIL, THEN CLICK AGAIN ON THE ENLARGED PHOTO IN THE LOWER RIGHT-HAND CORNER OF THIS PAGE AND FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS.

NOTE: TO LEARN ABOUT YAMATO'S EFFECTIVENESS IN BATTLE, READ ROBERT LUNDGREN'S SEMINAL WORK ON THE BATTLE OF LEYTE GULF: AMAZON PAGE:

'THE WORLD WONDER'D' - BATTLE OF LEYTE GULF by Robert Lundgren

YAMATO SHIRTS, POSTERS, MUGS, CAPS NOW AVAILABLE AT THE YAMATO ZAZZLE STORE:

BATTLESHIP YAMATO ZAZZLE STORE

All of the archive photos in this gallery were obtained by various researchers from the National Archives of the United States, and the US Navy Archives, and are in the Public Domain.

LINKS:

These will be of interest to all Yamato, Musashi, IJN, & warship fans:

IJN IN COLOR WEBSITE BY IROOTOKO_JR

MUSASHI EXPEDITION

CLASSICWARSHIPS.COM

IJN YAMATO - TABULAR RECORD OF MOVEMENT

THE ROBERT LUNDGREN HISTORICAL RESOURCE

MODEL WARSHIPS.COM

IMPERIAL JAPANESE NAVY PAGE (COMBINED FLEET)

MILITARY PHOTOS.NET

STEELNAVY.COM

IJN SHIP DOWNLOADABLE 'PERSONAS' FOR FIREFOX BROWSER

YAMATO'S FINAL BATTLE CGI FILM

YAMATO AT THE BATTLE OF LEYTE GULF CGI FILM

For a serious historical Pacific War discussion site, run by renowned historian Anthony Tully, co-author of "Shattered Sword - The Untold Story of The Battle of Midway", go here:

TULLY'S PORT

Finally, there are 3 indispensable books for any Yamato enthusiast:

Janusz Skulski-The Battleship Yamato-Anatomy of a Ship

Russell Spurr-A Glorious Way to Die - The Kamikaze Mission of the Battleship Yamato

Yoshida Mitsuru-Requiem for Battleship Yamato (An incredible survivor's account of the battle.)

A good reconstruction of Yamato as she appeared during her Final Sortie in April 1945 can be found at:

1:200 YAMATO MODEL

This site is a member of WebRing.
To browse visit Here.

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Operation Ten-ichi-go, April 6-7, 1945 
 
"Twenty torpedo tracks head toward Yamato. We take three hits on the port side. In the neighborhood of the aft tower."

"The overwhelming number of torpedoes has made it impossible, even with this ship's agility, to dodge them all.

A veritable circle of fire closes in on us: from above, from all points of the compass, glistening."

Yoshida Mitsuru, "Requiem for Battleship Yamato"

A description of the battle during the second attack wave, by which time the Yamato has already sustained heavy damage from multiple bomb hits described earlier.

Note: The torpedo strike in this photo - the plume of water rising about 50 stories above sea level - appears to depict the impact of one of the three hits described by Yoshida. If you look closely, a faint torpedo wake appears to be visible, leading to the point of the geyser of water. The smoke from the aft fire caused by the explosion of 6" Turret #2 is also visible.

Learning from the 9 hours it took to sink the Musashi 6 months earlier, the US Navy pilots are instructed to aim all of their torpedoes at one side of the ship (it turns out to be the port side), additionally aiming for the more lightly armored bow and stern sections. By creating massive flooding on just one side of the ship the idea was to make her capsize more quickly. It worked. It did not help matters any that a bomb knocked out the pumping control room during the second attack wave, making it impossible to flood the special exterior starboard compartments ('bubbles' ) that were meant specifically to help the ship keep her trim in just such an event.

In desperation, the aft starboard engine and boiler rooms are ordered flooded instead. This move rights the ship initially and buys her perhaps an additional 30 minutes of life, but cuts her speed in half to about 12-13 knots, at the cost of the lives of hundreds of sailors in those compartments, most of whom probably did not have time to get out once the alarm was sounded.

Probably 2/3 of the 18-20 torpedoes that hit struck the ship's port side.